The Importance of ABA Therapy and Speech Therapy

 
 
 

Blog logoYou have a non-verbal child. If you have to choose between speech therapy and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy, which one should you choose?

At an international autism research convention that Tracy attended, Dr. John McEachin, a licensed psychologist who has provided behavioral intervention to children with autism for more than 35 years, presented a soon-to-be-published study on the effectiveness of ABA therapy. ABA therapy is the only intervention empirically proven to provide results and it has been projected so far that children need 40 hours per week of ABA therapy for it to be most effective; however, Dr. McEachin’s study states that less hours of ABA therapy are JUST as effective IF the parents are really involved as well. Specific children, receiving less than 40 hours per week of ABA therapy, progressed just as fast because they had extremely involved parents.

So if you can only do one thing, do ABA. And stay involved!

This does not mean stop with speech therapy. Always continue with speech therapy, and try to find a therapist that combines speech and behavioral therapy, and preferably one that understands alternative sources of communication. You can have your speech therapist communicate with the Brent Woodall Foundation. Give the speech therapist, the BWF, and anyone else involved with your child’s therapies permission to talk with one another because this will help solidify your child’s schedule and goals.

Need a recommendation for a speech therapist? We can provide you with a few of our favorites! Just ask! info@woodallkids.org

Here’s an interesting article that also talks about the intensity and duration of ABA therapy.

Catch you at our next chat!

 
 

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